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The Academics Performing Arts Center

The Missing Piece

The Recital Hall

The construction of the Academic and Performing Arts Center has successfully started and currently is in progress. However, the enthusiasm for this center will be toned down until the recital hall is formally included on the floor plans. Due to the state’s economic downturn and to significant budget constraints, the UT Regents were unable to fund the replacement of the recital hall which was demolished in order to accommodate the new auditorium. The loss of our previous recital hall is extremely problematic for the Department of Music, its students, and for the University as a whole.

The recital hall is still the missing piece of the center. In order to bring this state-of-the-art hall to the Rio Grande Valley, we need $4 million of additional funding to include it in the construction project. The University of Texas-Pan American is counting on the generosity of UTPA alumni, the community and the arts lovers across the Valley to support the building of this long-awaited recital hall.

Why is the Recital Hall important?

It supports the University’s mission to provide the finest artistic, cultural, and educational events

The recital hall will serve the University and community as a performance space where junior and senior music majors could perform recitals. It will also provide a setting where visiting artists and faculty could hold master classes. Due to the technical requirements of these intense forms of teaching, these classes cannot be implemented in the large performance hall or classrooms and consequently involve the use of a recital hall.

In addition to providing space for spectacular performances, its performers - musicians, dancers, and other artists – need that same space in which to rehearse. In advance of a performance, it is critical to utilize the exact same space with all of its technical equipment, e.g. lighting, sound, etc., to create the finest possible performance.

Other University departments will also use the recital hall for special presentations. FESTIBA (Festival of International Books and Arts) and HESTEC (Hispanic Engineering, Science and Technology Conference) will host numerous events in this space during their annual weeklong conferences. These and other events showcase the amazing resources and talents of our University students and faculty as well as the community.

It enriches the entire Rio Grande Valley community

The University of Texas-Pan American plays an active role in the community. It serves as an engaged University, making its facilities available to local schools and community organizations. High schools from across the region will use the recital hall for University Interscholastic League (UIL) music competitions. From these regional competitions, top winners continue on to state-level matches. Without a recital hall, local competitions would have to be downsized and scattered to a number of different sites.

It ensures the future of The University of Texas-Pan American as a leader in shaping student musicians

The construction of the recital hall is crucial for the Department of Music. This department’s future and continued accreditation – through the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) and the Texas Association of Music Schools (TAMS) - depends on the existence of a recital hall.

The lack of an adequate recital hall will limit the department’s ability to grow its programs and enrollment, as well as its ability to attract new faculty. It will also adversely impact degree completion and graduation rates if students do not have a place to rehearse.

It addresses the campus’ severe lack of space

UTPA has the highest rate of space usage in the entire UT System. Without the recital hall, numerous activities will be shifted to other campus facilities. Furthermore, other auditoriums and large classrooms are already overused thereby limiting the Music Department’s ability to properly meet students’ needs. In addition, demand for space has been so high that the previous recital hall was often reserved more than a year in advance.