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Philosophy Program

Philosophy in UTPA's Core Curriculum

The Philosophy Program offers courses in two components of UTPA's Core Curriculum; the Mathematics component, and the Humanities component. All of our lower division course offerings, except PHIL 1321, satisfy the 041 Humanities component.  PHIL 1321 satisfies the Mathematics component for all COAH majors and many other non-engineering, non-science majors. The specific list of courses and the component areas they satisfy is below.

The 020 Mathematics Component of UTPA's Core

 

PHIL 1321 Intro to Formal Logic
This class is an introduction to some of the formal techniques available for evaluating the correctness or incorrectness of arguments. Formal techniques likely to be discussed include: symbolization in propositional logic, parsing trees, truth tables or truth trees, natural deduction in propositional logic, Venn diagrams, and the probability calculus. Restriction: Credit may be received for only one of PHIL 1320 and PHIL 1321.

Note: Not all degree programs will allow you to fulfill the Mathematics component of UTPA's Core Curriculum using PHIL 1321.

The 041 Humanities Component of UTPA's Core


PHIL 1305 Critical Thinking

This class will investigate what it is to think critically.  Strong emphasis will be placed on the following: reading critically, analyzing texts, identifying and systematically representing arguments, recognizing formal and informal fallacies, and rationally evaluating what is heard and said.

PHIL 1310 Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to some of the major philosophical questions that have intrigued mankind over the centuries. This will be done through an examination of the thought of some of the most important figures in the history of philosophy from the early Greeks to modern times. Credit Restriction: Credit may be received in only one of PHIL 1310 or PHIL 1387.

PHIL 1387 Introduction to Philosophy (Honors Plan)
An introduction to philosophical questions through an examination of major figures and themes in the history of philosophy from ancient to modern times. Credit Restriction: Credit may be received in only one of PHIL 1310 or PHIL 1387. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Studies Program or by permission of the program director.

PHIL 1388 Introduction to Logic (Honors Plan)
An introduction to the fundamentals of clear and effective thinking through an examination of the principles of correct reasoning, the structure of knowledge and common obstacles to rational thought. Credit Restriction: Credit may be received in only one of PHIL 1320 or PHIL 1388. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Studies Program or by permission of the program director.

PHIL 2330 Introduction to Ethics
This course will be concerned with human values: our own and those of other people. It will ask where those values come from and how we can know they are worth something, and it will examine several related questions such as personal freedom and the meaningfulness of human life.

PHIL 2350 Introduction to Social & Political Philosophy
A critical introduction to the current and historical relationships that define contemporary society and politics. Topics may include democracy, capitalism, communism, anarchism, political authority, norms, justices, rights, pluralism, and rights.

PHIL 2370 Introduction to Asian Philosophy
An analysis of the major movements in Eastern philosophy and religion and their relationship to basic philosophical developments in the West. This course will examine systems of thought and culture such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto.

PHIL 2380 Introduction to Latin American Philosophy
An examination of some of the most important and influential contributions to Latin American thought. Material to be studied will be drawn from both past and contemporary sources. Topics may include Mayan and Aztec Philosophy, Iberian Scholasticism, Social and Political Philosophy, Latin American Positivism, Liberation Theology and/or Philosophy, Latin American Feminism, and Hispanic/Latino/a Identity.

PHIL 2390 Professional Ethics
This course will employ the tools of ethical theory to examine moral issues and problems facing professionals in such fields as business, industry and technology, medicine, social work, criminal justice and law. The content of individual sections of this course may be derived from any of the fields listed above or from a combination of them, depending on student need.

PHIL 2391 Professional Ethics: Biomedical
This course will address the application of moral theories, ethical principles, and professional codes to ethical dilemmas faced by professionals in healthcare or research. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to, euthanasia, conflicts of interest, physicians as researchers, distribution of scare resources, and the impact of theories like moral relativism and psychological egoism on the application of ethical theory.

PHIL 2392 Professional Ethics: Business
This course will address the application of moral theories, ethical principles, and professional codes to ethical dilemmas faced by business professionals, employers, and employees. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to, conflicts of interest, globalization, duties to future generations, stakeholder theory, the value of labor, and the impact of theories like moral relativism and psychological egoism on the application of ethical theory.

PHIL 2393 Professional Ethics: Engineering
This course will address the application of moral theories, ethical principles, and professional codes to ethical dilemmas faced by business professionals, employers, and employees. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to, whistleblowing, integrity, honesty, liability, and the impact of theories like moral relativism and psychological egoism on the application of ethical theory.

PHIL 2395 Environmental Ethics
Application of moral theories and ethical principles to environmental issues. The nature and extent of human responsibility for the environment; the concepts of “nature” and “natural,” whether nature and the environment are intrinsically or merely instrumentally valuable; the nature and extent of our responsibilities to future generations, and whether entities other than humans have moral rights.

 

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